Domes + Architecture

Domes have been a part of architecture throughout our history. Domes have been constructed out of various materials around the world for centuries - animal bones, hay, clay, bricks, metal and now concrete. You can see the influence of domes in on a grand scale in these famous architectural feats like the Taj Mahal and the US Capitol.

The dome has also served in architecture for individual homes and community buildings, stretching back for centuries. These domes have provided shelter to different cultures. The igloo is commonly considered one of the older examples. These Zulu Huts are another example of dome homes.

Now, we at HDomes are building modern domes using airform, basalt, and shotcrete. This type of dome was pioneered by the three South brothers who founded Monolithic Domes. These domes share the same amazing features that have made dome homes appealing to cultures around the world.  Dome homes and buildings are eco-friendly by using less materials and being naturally insulated.  Domes are also incredibly structurally sound and will last for decades, withstanding natural disasters such as earthquakes, fires and hurricanes.

Domes & Global Aid

We are proud to be in the 2017 DIHAD Global Aid Directory!  

HDomes builds EcoShells and monolithic Domes.  We supply the training, equipment and techniques to aid in disaster recovery and reconstruction as well as large scale urban redevelopment.  Our EcoShell construction system allows for the rapid construction of a large number of inexpensive houses and community buildings. Our structures are built using local labor and materials, the are earthquake/hurricane/fire proof with a very long life expectancy and low on-going maintenance requirements.  EcoShells provide the local community with income, skills and the ability to literally rebuild their lives. 

 

Maniche, Haiti

Maniche, Haiti

Our rapidly build community buildings can be used as schools, clinics, police stations, places of worship and food storage facilities.  By utilizing the local workforce, we give the end users a stake in the project and ownership in the finished product. We have worked for WANGO (World Association of NGO's) on a large scale reconstruction project in Indonesia and for Haiti H.E.R>O. on a large orphanage project in Haiti amongst many others.  We have build climate controlled buildings, residential and commercial, as well as large Tornado shelters for FEMA in the US and around the world.  FEMA rate our buildings as "near absolute protection." 

Together we can build communities and shelter that will last life times. 

@domes4homes

hdomes.com

Building EcoShells Without Steel?

Why are we building EcoShells without steel? 

Steel reinforced concrete is an incredible invention that has allowed for the construction of all the major cities that exist today.  However, if water is allowed to reach the steel embedded in the concrete it corrodes the steel, causing it to expand and crack the concrete.  Most of the bridges in the US and around the world are suffering from this flaw that in some cases causes failure of the structure. 

We have started working with Basalt rebar on our EcoShell projects and have developed specific basalt products to help with the construction of EcoShells. 

rebar basalt.jpg

We are the first company to build viable EcoShells with absolutely no structural steel elements.  Using basalt to provide the tensile strength component in our concrete, we can build EcoShells that are structurally sound and will be unaffected by the possibility of steel corrosion. This allows less concrete to be used and the lifespan of the buildings to be greatly increased.

Concrete Through The Ages

Dan Hildebrand, founder of HDomes Consultation & Construction recently visited the town of Mérida in Spain.  The town was founded in 25 BC, with the name of Emerita Augusta (meaning the veterans – discharged soldiers – of the army of Augustus, who founded the city; the name Mérida is an evolution of this) by order of Emperor Augustus, to protect a pass and a bridge over the Guadiana river  Mérida is probably the best preserved of all the Roman towns in Spain and use of concrete as one of the main building components is still visible everywhere.  An amphitheater - where gladiators fought, a theater - where plays were performed and the Circus Maximus - where chariot races were held, and a huge viaduct that supplied the town with water are all still visible.